Pot Does This To Your Brain



Potheads, Concussion Research and More

Teen-pot-smoking-fbPot Leads to Brain Rot

Medical marijuana is becoming widespread in the United States, but can regularly toking actually cause health problems? It can, according to NBC News. A new study published in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin found that young pot smokers were damaging the subcortical region of their brains, which is linked to memory and reason.

“We see that adolescents are at a very vulnerable stage neurodevelopmentally,” said lead researcher Matthew Smith, PhD, with the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. “And if you throw stuff into the brain that’s not supposed to be there, there are long-term implications for their development.”

So if you’re getting ready to light up, you might want to take a second and reconsider – before you forget you read this in the first place.

NFL, NIH Team Up

The NFL and the National Institutes of Health have teamed up to fund more research on concussions, the NIH announced. The million joint venture will study the effects of repeated head injuries and concussions, and aims to improve concussion diagnosis and treatment.

Concussions Not Limited to NFL

The MLB might want to join in on that research, according to CNN. Ryan Freel, the former big leaguer who committed suicide last December, is the first MLB player to be diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) – a condition commonly seen in NFL players that arises from repeated blows to the head.

"It provides some solace that there is a reason now for Ryan having done what he did," said Clark Vargas, Freel’s stepfather. "Knowing that he'd been suffering for 11 years and that CTE is a progressive disease, it gives explanation (for) some of the irrational things that he may have done. You know, he had a reason."

And while concussions are thought of as a football injury, 18 major league baseball players were placed on the disabled list with concussions in 2013.

Routine Surgery is Anything But

Thirteen-year-old Jahi McMath went into Children’s Hospital in Oakland for a routine tonsillectomy, and at first, everything appeared to go well. Jahi was alert and responsive after surgery, even asking for a popisicles.  However, Jahi went into cardiac arrest 30 minutes after surgery and was declared brain dead two days later, the NBC Bay Area News reports.

“She wasn’t able to talk, and she started to write notes to her mother saying I’m swallowing too much mucus, mom – am I OK? Mom – I feel like I’m choking,” her uncle, Omar Sealey, said.

The hospital said they are reviewing the case.

-Amir Khan, Everyday Health Staff Writer

Last Updated:12/16/2013
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Video: G2Voice #031 An interview with Rick Simpson about the health benefits of Cannabis Extract 4/16/17

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Date: 12.12.2018, 22:03 / Views: 43575